The more time you spend on the roadways of North Carolina, the more you’ll realize that there’s no escaping construction zones. While it’s necessary in order to keep the state’s infrastructure in good working condition, it poses a variety of risks to you as a driver.

Understanding why road construction zones see more accidents can help you adjust your driving style, all with the idea of maintaining your safety. Here are some things to keep in mind as you approach and drive through a construction zone:

  • Tight spaces: While not always the case, construction zones often have narrower lanes. And for that reason, you don’t have nearly as much room to navigate. Add this to the fact that barriers may line the road on one or both sides, and you have a recipe for disaster.
  • Construction workers: In addition to motor vehicles, you also have to contend with construction workers in the area. These people are walking from site to site, operating heavy equipment and moving supplies around. Even though they understand the importance of staying away from moving traffic, it’s not always possible to do so.
  • Distractions: Construction zones are full of distractions, which increases the likelihood that someone in close proximity to your vehicle will take their eyes off the road. Maybe they’re looking at the work that’s being completed. Or maybe they’re wondering why a construction worker isn’t doing their job. Regardless of the type of distraction, it poses a major threat to everyone on the road.
  • Changing rules of the road: For instance, there’s a good chance that the speed limit will change as you enter a construction zone. However, if you don’t see the sign, you could proceed without lowering your speed.

These are just a few of the many reasons why road construction zones often see more accidents. As you approach this situation, it’s necessary to adjust your driving style to protect yourself to the best of your ability.

Should another driver cause an accident, such as someone who is speeding through a construction zone, find a safe place to pull over, call 911 for help and then take steps to protect your legal rights as your health allows.