Farris & Thomas Law
PLEASE NOTE: Our office remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. However, to keep our staff and you healthy, we do ask that business be conducted over the phone or via email if possible. We can also accommodate video conferencing as well. Please contact our office directly for options on making a payment.
Farris & Thomas Law

PLEASE NOTE: Our office remains open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. However, to keep our staff and you healthy, we do ask that business be conducted over the phone or via email if possible.  We can also accommodate video conferencing as well.  Please contact our office directly for options on making a payment.

Farris & Thomas Law

Driving while you’re sick could put you at risk

On Behalf of | Mar 7, 2022 | Motor Vehicle Accidents |

You’ve probably never thought about being at risk of a crash when driving just because you have a head cold. It’s irritating, but your cold doesn’t have a significant impact on how you see or handle your vehicle.

At the same time, you may be having to blow your nose or have a headache that is bothering you. You may have eye irritation from sinus pressure or pain in your jaw. All of these little irritants can add up, and they can make you a more dangerous driver.

Sick? Call off or find a ride

If you’re sick, it’s not a bad idea to call off work or to find a ride to your job. When you’re sick, your body is going to be more intolerant to a lack of sleep or a long work day. You may find that you’re dizzy or disoriented, both of which would make it dangerous for you to drive.

A common cold can make you feel unwell, and just feeling unlike yourself is enough to impact your ability to drive. You may have a hard time staying in your lane when you sneeze or have your concentration affected because of an earache. If you take cough or cold medicine, you may become drowsy or anxious, both side effects of these kinds of drugs.

Driving while distracted or impaired by your cold could lead to a crash

It’s the truth that driving while sick could mean that you’re too unwell to be safe on the road. Coughing, sneezing, dizziness and tiredness may all combine to cause a crash. For that reason, you need to stay out from behind the wheel and allow someone else to get you to your destination.

If you’re hit by someone who is sick or who took over-the-counter medications for a cold, you’ll have the right to pursue a personal injury claim against them. They could also face charges for distracted or reckless driving, which is something to keep in mind the next time you consider driving while unwell, too. Driving when you’re not feeling your best is dangerous, so plan for another option to get you to work, school or home.

Archives

Categories

FindLaw Network